#18: Neville Sigauke

#18: Neville Sigauke

by The Healer Hip Hop | Podcast

Neville Sigauke is a Rapper and Artist who was born and raised in different parts of Zimbabwe and now lives in South Africa. Growing up in different cultures of Zimbabwe, he decided to overcome the ongoing tribalism by mixing Shona and Ndebele and sounds and fuse it into what he calls Mbira Dze Hip Hop – it stands for something unique that was born in Zimbabwe and for identity.

The Mbira is an important music instrument when it comes to traditional music of Zimbabwe. It is played with the thumbs and it’s also used for traditional ceremonies and meditation.

Neville has two projects on the way – his first solo album and a joint project with his rapper colleague and friend YStan. Both projects will mix hip hop with traditonal and tribal elements.

You can find more about Neville on Youtube, SoundCloud, Instagram and Facebook.

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#15: Boqor Bantu zur Geschichte Afrikas – Black History Month Special

#15: Boqor Bantu zur Geschichte Afrikas

by The Healer Hip Hop | Podcast

 Oktober ist Black History Month im Vereinten Königreich und ich dachte mir, ich möchte auch in Deutschland mehr Wissen über afrikanische Geschichte und deren Auswirkungen auf unsere Gesellschaft heute verbreiten.

Dazu habe ich ein Interview mit Boqor Bantu aufgenommen, der regelmäßig auf IG über die Geschichte Afrikas postet. Er ist im Moment sogar selbst in Nairobi und hat sich extra für The Healer Hip Hop Zeit genommen.

Passend zum Thema läuft hier für euch das Album “Platz an der Sonne” von BSMG, welches ebenfalls Geschichte und Gegenwart Afrikas thematisiert.

 

Racism is like a Cadillac, they bring out a new model every year.

Malcolm X

Boqor Bantu’s dazugehörigen Artikel (auf Englisch) findet ihr in der Rubrik “The Healer“. Dort schreibt er über die Frage “Black History Month – Has Colonialism really ended?” Darüber hinaus haben wir im Podcast auch über die heutige Situation geredet, von der Flüchtlingskrise über unser westliches und oft falsches Bild von Afrika. Eine gute Doku, die unser Bild von Afrika gerade rückt findet ihr in der 6-teiligen Arte-Serie “Digital Africa“.

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Black History Month – Has colonialism really ended?

October is Black History Month in the UK and I want to help spread knowledge about both African history and present challenges. So I asked German-Kenyan Boqor Bantu, who regularly posts about African history on IG and Facebook, to write a guest post for The Healer Hip Hop…

 

Racism is like a Cadillac, they bring out a new model every year.

Malcolm X

 

The same somehow applies for colonialism. Africa is challenged with a new colonial invasion which is not less destructive and exploiting in its dimension than the colonialism of the 19th century. Britain’s Government and economy is still heavily involved in today’s Scramble for Africa.

How did the first colonial invasion in Africa start?

To figure that out you have to follow the financial interests of the British Empire. The British Empire first only had a few bases in West-Africa, which mainly served as Britain’s trading venue for cheap labour force for the colonies in America and the Caribbean – Millions of Africans were sold into slavery.
When slavery was abolished in 1807 by the Slave Trade Act, other interests in Africa arose. At first, safe ports were established along the African coast for the trade route to India, with the purpose to build outposts stretching from Egypt to South Africa. Then, the Brits started to do more and more explorations further into the African continent, resulting in the exploitation of African resources and the destruction of African societies. By the end of the 19th century, every European country wanted its own piece of Africa culminating in the Berlin Conference of 1884, known as the Scramble of Africa: European governments gathered together in Berlin and divided the African continent among themselves. Not one African representative was part of this Conference!
Britain got what we call today Egypt, Sudan, Gambia, Zimbabwe, a part of Somalia, Kenya, Sierra Leone, Uganda, South Africa, Botswana, Nigeria, Ghana, Malawi, Zimbabwe and Zambia – this meant power over 30% of the African people.

The British established three different kinds of rulership in its colonies:

  • Indirect rulership mainly in West-Africa (Europeans didn’t want to live there because of the extreme climate and diseases like Malaria) by favoring and supporting a specific minority over the other tribes living in that country. For example, in Nigeria they gave power to Fulanis to rule over the others or in Sudan to the Arab minority
  • In other countries a company rulership was established by giving land to British companies to administer it and the people living on it
  • The third version of rulership was the Settler Colonialism, which was the cruelest form of all because it sought to replace the original population with a new society of settlers. A large number of British settlers immigrating into mainly Southern African countries forced resettlements to make space for themselves. More severe effects were the rape of women, endless torture, murder, castration and concentration camps

With all this knowledge, it’s shocking that a poll from YouGov in 2016 shows that 44% of the British people are proud of their colonial past.

After their fights for independence, all African countries are free from British rule now, aren’t they?

A new wave of colonialism is flooding Africa these days and it is driven by the plundering and exploiting of natural resources like gold, platinum, diamonds, oil, cupper, silver, coltan, cobalt, and many more. More than 100 mainly British companies are listed on the London Stock market, which have mining activities going on in about 37 different African countries. This means they are controlling more than 1 Trillion worth of resources!
Their concessions cover a staggering 1.03 million square kilometers of African land.
The British government is also heavily involved in the new Scramble for Africa. It argues that Africa should continue staying the primary resource provider and supports African regimes which enable the access to resources for foreign companies. It also works to prevent regularities and protection barriers for commodity trade. This results in African governments holding only minority shares of mining companies and if they do it’s only 5-20%. Additionally, one quart of these British companies is operating in tax havens and many more are given tax incentives, so African governments and more importantly the people are losing billions of tax revenues every year!

However, the worst effect of this new colonial invasion is the violation of human rights, and the social and environmental exploitation. Working condition and environmental regulation naturally enforced in the UK, are completely ignored from a lot of British companies operating in Africa! Harmful acids and insufficient safety equipment are often used to extract minerals. This results in the killing of plant life and severe health issues for the African population.
For example, in Zambia Thousands of people were polluted by contaminated water and many are still affected today by kidney and liver issues as well as miscarriages. Other practices are forced resettlements with empty promises of building new homes, labor rights violations like loan cuts and even the involvement in killings: In South Africa, 34 people were killed during a strike by the police. A transcript of a meeting between the Lonmin company and the police showed how much the police was pressured by Lonmin to end the strike.
These facts barely make the mainstream news, that’s why we give them room here today, for Black History Month. To end this article with another quote: 

Not everything that is faced can be changed. But nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

This year’s Black History Month UK is working with Organ Donation UK  to raise awareness that there is still an urgent shortage of donors to help black patients who need lifesaving or life enhancing blood transfusions and organ transplants. Since I used to be in need of a kidney (you can follow my journey on needanukidney.org) I strongly support the cause!

In England 40,000 more black blood donors are needed to meet demand and there are also 632 black people waiting for a transplant. Show your support and register to become a regular blood donor or sign the Organ Donor Register.

#14: GiwHa – The Artist formerly known as Musiqman

#14: GiwHa - The artist formerly known as Musiq Man

by GiwHa | The Healer Hip Hop

GiwHa is a quite diverse artist: he is a singer, songwriter, DJ, producer and plays the Piano, bass, drum machine, percussions and a little bit of Sax all by himself.

Born in Nigeria, and raised in Brighton, UK, he grew up listening to a lot of music at home, such as Fela Kuti, Billy Ocean, Marvin Gaye and always played music in church where his mom would sing.

He studied engineering at university, which was more of a back up plan than his true passion. However, this has prepared him for the technical side of music so that it came easy for him to produce music.

 

I don’t follow people. I follow what I do. GiwHa

Yet, it wasn’t until after his mother had passed away in 2007, that he finally started doing music properly as a producer around 2009. Under the name Musiq Man he has since published two instrumental albums.

Finally artists like Kendrick Lamar, Anderson .Paak and a chat he had with Robert Glasper backstage at the Love Supreme Festival convinved him that there was room out there for his own voice.

 

People need to hear it from me too. GiwHa

He felt like the name Musiq Man was very generic, so he finally went with a name that meant something to him and that was unique:

GiwHa – after his Grandpa Giwa.

GiwHa only met his Grandfather when he was very young and he remembers that he was scared of him and didn’t want to touch him. He later got to know more about him and learned that he resembles his Grandfather, who was a very important man in his town – Giwa means leader, he was adviser to the King. GiwHa began to realize that that’s ME!

Find out more about GiwHa on Bandcamp or follow him on Social Media!

Music as a Healer:
“Music has always been a healer to me. My first album is dedicated to my mom. She passed away in 2007. She was a singer and music was her passion and I couldn’t think of anything else to make her this proud. I’ve always used music for everything and to express myself.”

GiwHa

Like my work?

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The Healer Hip Hop Playlist August 2018

 

Check out The Healer Hip Hop Playlist August 2018!

This month’s playlist is all about my upcoming Kidney Transplant Surgery. Of course, I’m a bit “Nervous”, I will feal “Reborn”, I try to be “Fearless” and have “No Worries”. Depending on how I’ll feel I’ll soon be back here for you and The Healer Hip Hop.

You can follow my journey on my blog Needanukidney (only in German at the moment until I get back with hopefully way more energy). Also, any prayers, good wishes, health tips, music tips are much appreciated! 

 

 

Until then enjoy some sweet summer music – I added some nice African music I heard on my son’s father African Summer Grill Party and you should have seen me in the car acting all Spice Adams when the songs played ;-)))

 

Unfortunately, my favorite song, Salone Party, isn’t on Apple Music nor Spotify, so here you go:
Here are the links to this month’s Playlist on Spotify and Apple Music.

 

Until soon,

xxx, Ana

Ayo – Fearless

Kid Cudi – Reborn

Nas – Everything

Etta Bond – Let me hit it

#08: Langa Mavuso – Urban Soul Singer from South Africa

#08: Langa Mavuso

by The Healer Hip Hop | Podcast

I first noticed Langa on Instagram singing Sunday Blues on UCT Live room https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yzGiXEWpCc and fell instantly for his music, which is influenced by the sounds of Frank Ocean, Kwabs,Solange, Donny Hathaway, Luther Vandross, Marvin Gaye but also the sounds of his home South Africa. Born and raised in Johannesburg, he was surrounded with music from an early age and he knew very early on that singing was what he was going to do in this life. I spoke with him about his upbringing, about the music scene in South Africa and his vision of providing musical education and workshops for all children in South Africa. I also asked if I can share some of his songs with you, so today’s epsiode is full of beautiful soul music!

Follow Langa on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/langamav/
and subscribe to his music on SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/nathi_mavuso
Also I want to give a shoutout to my friend Melly who did today’s intro! She’s also a fan of Langa’s, so she was the perfect fit. Say hi to her in Instagram https://www.instagram.com/likkle_but_tallawah/ Thank you Melly!