#27: Kathy Iandoli – God save the Queens

#27: Kathy Iandoli

by The Healer Hip Hop | Podcast

In this episode I talked with Kathy Iandoli about her new book “Go save the Queens” – the long overdue ‘her’story of women in Hip Hop written by the veteran Hip Hop author. 

It’s About time 

Every history of hip-hop previously published, from Jeff Chang’s Can’t Stop Won’t Stop to Shea Serrano’s The Rap Yearbook, focuses primarily on men, glaringly omitting a thorough and respectful examination of the presence and contribution of the genre’s female artists.

For far too long, women in hip-hop have been relegated to the shadows, viewed as the designated “First Lady” thrown a contract, a pawn in some beef, or even worse. But as Kathy Iandoli makes clear, the reality is very different. Today, hip-hop is dominated by successful women such as Cardi B and Nicki Minaj, yet there are scores of female artists whose influence continues to resonate.

Hail to the Queens

God Save the Queens pays tribute to the women of hip-hop—from the early work of Roxanne Shante, to hitmakers like Queen Latifah and Missy Elliot, to the superstars of today. Exploring issues of gender, money, sexuality, violence, body image, feuds, objectification and more, God Save the Queens is an important and monumental work of music journalism that at last gives these influential female artists the respect they have long deserved.

I can’t even imagine what it must have been like to be a female Hip Hop artist in the 90’s. During that time period where first they’re throwing money at you and then by 99 they’re taking all the money away. And they’ll tell you: Look sexy! Not too sexy! Be lyrical! Not lyrical enough!

Kathy Iandoli

Author

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#27: Kathy Iandoli – God save the Queens

#27: Kathy Iandoli – God save the Queens

In this episode I talked with Kathy Iandoli about her new book "Go save the Queens" - the long overdue 'her'story of women in Hip Hop written by the veteran Hip Hop author.  It's About time  Every history of hip-hop previously published, from Jeff Chang’s Can’t Stop...

read more
The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019

The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019

 Check out The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019! Apple and Spotify Congrats on Mahalia for her first release album! I've been following her for a while now and love her debut!Also big congrats to Lafyette from episode #19 on his first release! His song We love, then...

read more
The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019

The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019

  Check out The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019! Apple and Spotify Until soon, xxx, AnaYou can support my work if you become a Patron. It's simple: choose one of 4 tiers and receive shoutouts, free The Healer Hip Hop Merch, behind the scenes access and more!

read more

#26 I.Am.Tru.Starr

#26: I.Am.Tru.Starr

by The Healer Hip Hop | Podcast

Hope for the Hopeless

In today’s episode of The Healer Hip Hop Podcast I interview US rapper and singer I.Am.Tru.Starr. His name is an affirmation for himself and anyone who says it. I.Am.Tru.Starr was born and raised in Rochester, New York. There, he has seen and been through some tough times that he references in his music.

On his first album “Old Stuff”, released in 2015, he says about those hard times: “Wish I could drop a tear, but my sorrow well dried up”. Ironically, the song’s name is ‘Joy’. However, he wants to give “Hope for the Hopeless” as he raps in the following song “Night calls”.

Despite his modest upstate roots, he made this his mission and purpose. I.Am.Tru.Starr is working with the intention to lead by example. With a dedicated passion to show the next generation that beautiful things can grow out of what others consider a deadbeat town. 

Before music, I don’t feel like life was really anything. It was just life in the ghetto. I.Am.Tru.Starr

Artist

Evolving with every album

You can’t put his music in a box. With the help of his long-time team of producers he navigates through genres and styles. One time, he raps smoothly and laid back as in the song “26 inches”. (I added it to my March playlist and it was the first song I heard of him.)

At other times he sings a powerful mantra: “A 20 Thousand Dollar watch won’t buy you more hours. But look into the mirror and you see your power” (“Power.”). When you listen to his music you’ll notice that he gets more versatile with every album.

He personally uses the word Soul Hop to best describe his style that mixes elements of hip-hop, R&B, funk, gospel and alt-soul.

Representation matters

His 2015 EP “Hair like Basquiat” was most influenced by one of the most prevalent issues of that year: the killing of unarmed People of Color by the Police, which seemed to have reached a sad peak in the public eye. With the album he wanted to create a manifest for the much needed self-love for himself and PoC in general. His hair, which actually looked like Basquiat’s at the time, was a further representation of this self-love.  

Smoke Break

“Smoke Break”, his latest work of art which was released in 2018, is a Soundtrack to his directorial debut. The “Smoke Break Movie” that came with the album. is about what price you’re willing to pay to create the life you want. If you want get in touch with I.Am.Tru.Starr you can follow him on IG, Youtube, Facebook.

Listen to the full Interview with I.Am.Tru.Starr on The Healer Hip Hop Podcast on you Podcast App, Spotify or on this blog.

 

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#27: Kathy Iandoli – God save the Queens

#27: Kathy Iandoli – God save the Queens

In this episode I talked with Kathy Iandoli about her new book "Go save the Queens" - the long overdue 'her'story of women in Hip Hop written by the veteran Hip Hop author.  It's About time  Every history of hip-hop previously published, from Jeff Chang’s Can’t Stop...

read more
The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019

The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019

 Check out The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019! Apple and Spotify Congrats on Mahalia for her first release album! I've been following her for a while now and love her debut!Also big congrats to Lafyette from episode #19 on his first release! His song We love, then...

read more
The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019

The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019

  Check out The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019! Apple and Spotify Until soon, xxx, AnaYou can support my work if you become a Patron. It's simple: choose one of 4 tiers and receive shoutouts, free The Healer Hip Hop Merch, behind the scenes access and more!

read more

#25: Tacheles und Tarantismus

#25: Tacheles und tarantismus

by The Healer Hip Hop | Podcast

Ich habe mich im letzten November mit Tobias Frühauf und Philipp Wolpert, den beiden Gründern des Heilbronner Theaterlabels Tacheles und Tarantismus für dieses Interview getroffen.

Wir haben bei Falafel Beirut darüber geredet, was ein Theaterlabel eigentlich überhaupt macht, wofür Tacheles und Tarantismus steht und wie sie Theater neu denken und revolutionieren und wollen.

Tacheles und Tarantismus steht in Kurzform für TNT, also Sprengstoff. Wir sorgen dafür, dass wir unangenehme Dinge ansprechen, die in unserer Gesellschaft passieren.

Tacheles und Tarantismus

Theaterlabel

Die beiden haben im Herbst 2018 zusammen mit Rappern und anderen Künstlern (Juicy Gay, Dennis Da Mennace, Sasa Stubbs, Thea Rasche, Andreas Posthoff, Raik Singer, Leah Wewoda, Alexander Ilic, Michel Schulze und Gunnar Schwarm) die Trapoper “UBU” im Heilbronner Club Mobilat aufgeführt.

Was sie dabei erfahren durften, wie das Publikum auf das neue Format reagierte, ihre Verbindung zur Musik und was sie für Pläne für die Zukunft haben hört ihr in diesem Interview.

Wenn ihr Teil der Revolte sein wollt und wissen, was Tacheles und Tarantismus demnächst vorhaben, folgt ihnen auf Facebook und Instagram oder schaut vorbei auf ihrer Seite. 

#24: Refugee Canteen

#24: Refugee Canteen

by The Healer Hip Hop | Podcast

In der heutigen Episode unterhalte ich mich mit Beni aus Hamburg, dem Gründer von Refugee Canteen.

Die Refugee Canteen ist die erste gastronomische Vorschule, die Menschen mit Migrationshintergrund und Geflüchteten eine Grundlagenausbildung für gastronomische Berufe vermittelt.

Beni und sein Team setzen dabei auf die Kombination aus praxisnaher Kenntnisvermittlung und dem Erleben in der gastronomischen “Echtwelt”. Hierbei unterstützen sie renommierte Restaurants und Hotels, indem sie interessante Einsatzstellen zur Verfügung stellen.

Ich freu mich, dass wir auf so vielen Ebenen eine Win-Win Situation erzeugen können und dass das Thema Geflüchtete nicht so schwer ist.

Beni

Refugee Canteen

Im Interview erzählt Beni wie er in der Gastronomie ein zu Hause und sich selbst gefunden hat und wie das ihn dazu bewegt hat Refugee Canteen zu gründen. Er erzählt auch von den Herausforderungen, die das Projekt mit sich brachte, aber auch den Erfolgserlebnissen.

Wer Refugee Canteen unterstützen oder vielleicht in seiner eigenen Stadt eine Eigene gründen möchte, kann hier mit Beni und seinem Team in Kontakt treten. Ansonsten freuen sie sich auch über Besuch und geben gern auch mal ein Essen aus. 

 

#23: Black History Month 2019 mit Boqor Bantu

#23: Black History Month mit Boqor Bantu

by The Healer Hip Hop | Podcast

Black History Month

Jedes Jahr im Februar wird in zahlreichen Ländern der Black History Month (BHM) gefeiert um die Geschichte Schwarzer Menschen in aller Welt zu würdigen. Diese Tradition geht auf das Jahr 1926 zurück, als der Historiker Carter G. Woodson eine Veranstaltungsreihe initiierte, um die breite Öffentlichkeit in den USA über Schwarze Geschichte und die kulturellen, wirtschaftlichen und gesellschaftlichen Leistungen der afro-amerikanischen Bevölkerung aufmerksam zu machen.

Auch in Deutschland wird BHM seit Anfang der 1990 vielen Städten von der Initiative Schwarze Menschen in Deutschland e.V. (ISD) organisiert.

Afro-Deutsche Geschichte

Wie schon in Podcast Episode #15, zum BHM UK im Oktober, habe ich mich auf ein Interview mit Boqor Bantu von  Geschichte Afrikas getroffen, um anhand von drei afro-deutschen Autobiografien über die Geschichte von Schwarzen Deutschen zu reden. Soulsänger Billheincock, der in seinen Liedern auch von seinen eigenen Erfahrungen als afrikanischer Deutscher erzählt, war so freundlich mir seinen passenden Song “Dealer” zur Verfügung zu stellen.

(Im Podcast habe ich von der Organisation “Über den Berg” erzählt. Der Verein heißt Mountain Activity Club und organisiert Trips in die Berge und über die Alpen für ehemalige Drogensüchtige.)

Londri Mingolo-Tite:

Allein in einer fremden Welt

Geboren und in den ersten Jahre beim Vater und der Oma im Kongo aufgewachsen, beschreibt Londri Mingolo-Tite seine Lebensgeschichte, erzählt von den unbeschwerten Kinderjahren im Kongo und wie er schließlich mit sieben Jahren von der Familie ganz allein ins Flugzeug gesetzt wird und über Umwegen nach Deutschland kommt. Er schildert den Kulturschock in dieser gänzlich anderen Mentalität. Er erzählt vom Alleinsein ohne Halt und Orientierung, ernüchtert von der harten Realität des Alltags in Deutschland und der schwierigen Integration.

Von den Problemen als ›schwarzer‹ Asylbewerber in Deutschland, den Verlockungen unserer ›weißen Welt‹, seinem Abrutschen in die Kriminalität, dem Großwerden in einem Heim der Jugendhilfe, bis zum Abschluss der Regelschule und dem Erlernen eines Berufes und dem Antritt einer Arbeitsstelle als Krankenpfleger in Trier.

Er beschreibt in harten Worten seine persönlichen Erfahrungen und seine Entwicklung vom Kind zum kleinkriminellen Gangster in Köln und Umland bis zum resozialisierten und integrierten ›Normalo‹ mit Frau und Tochter. Dieses Buch zeigt schonungslos und offen die Risiken der deutschen Asylpolitik, aber auch die Chancen und Ressourcen einer gelungenen Integration. Diese Geschichte ist real und wahr und brandaktuell.

Die Würde des Deutschen ist unantastbar.

Londri Mingolo-Tite

Hans J. Massaquoi:

Ein unaussprechlicher Titel

Als Sohn einer weißen Mutter und eines schwarzen Vaters wächst Hans-Jürgen Massaquoi in großbürgerlichen Verhältnissen in Hamburg auf. Doch eines Tages verlässt der Vater das Land. Hans-Jürgen und seine Mutter bleiben zurück und ziehen in ein Arbeiterviertel. Als die Nazis die Macht übernehmen, verändert sich ihr Leben grundlegend.

Hans J. Massaquoi beschreibt in seiner außergewöhnlichen Autobiographie seine Kindheit und Jugend zwischen 1926 und 1948 als einer der wenigen schwarzen Deutschen in diesem Land.

Theodor Michael:

Deutsch sein und schwarz dazu

Theodor Michaels Vater kam vor dem Ersten Weltkrieg aus Kamerun, damals deutsches »Schutz gebiet«, nach Deutschland und wurde wie andere Kolonialmigranten freundlich aufgenommen. Er heiratete eine Deutsche und gründete eine Familie. Doch schon während der Weimarer Republik fand man, Farbige sollten den Deutschen keine Arbeitsplätze mehr wegnehmen. Bald konnten sie nur noch in den sehr beliebten »Völkerschauen« unterkommen. In der Nazizeit wurden ihnen die deutschen Pässe entzogen. Nur als stumme Komparsen in den zahl reichen Kolonialfilmen waren sie noch gefragt.

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#27: Kathy Iandoli – God save the Queens

#27: Kathy Iandoli – God save the Queens

In this episode I talked with Kathy Iandoli about her new book "Go save the Queens" - the long overdue 'her'story of women in Hip Hop written by the veteran Hip Hop author.  It's About time  Every history of hip-hop previously published, from Jeff Chang’s Can’t Stop...

read more
The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019

The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019

 Check out The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019! Apple and Spotify Congrats on Mahalia for her first release album! I've been following her for a while now and love her debut!Also big congrats to Lafyette from episode #19 on his first release! His song We love, then...

read more
The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019

The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019

  Check out The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019! Apple and Spotify Until soon, xxx, AnaYou can support my work if you become a Patron. It's simple: choose one of 4 tiers and receive shoutouts, free The Healer Hip Hop Merch, behind the scenes access and more!

read more

#22: Rap for Refugees

#22: Rap for Refugees

by The Healer Hip Hop | Podcast

Heute ist Rap for Refugees Gründer Ata Anat zu Gast beim The Healer Hip Hop Podcast:

Im Dezember 2017 gestartet mit der Idee jährlich Festivals zu veranstalten, ist Rap for Refugees innnerhalb von nur einem Jahr zu einer festen Größe zur Förderung des interkulturellen Austauschs und der Diversität geworden in Deutschland. Als Werkzeuge dienen die Subkulturen des Hip Hop mit Rap, Beatbox, Hip Hop Tanz, Graffiti und DJing!

Über 50 Auftritte mit Workshops oder dem Kollektiv Rapfugees hat Gründer Ata Anat 2018 für Rap for Refugees bereits veranstaltet. Mittlerweile bietet der Verein an vielen Schulen Rap Ags oder Projektwochen in Beatboxen und Rap an. 

Das Projekt wurde auch innerhalb kurzer Zeit weit über die deutsche Ländergrenze hinaus bekannt. Im Juli 2018 veröffentlichte die UN-Flüchtlingshilfe folgenden Beitrag über Rap for Refugees:

Von Anfang an ist das Trio BSMG – Megaloh, Musa BlnNgrtd (von Episode 4) und Ghanaian Stallion treuer Unterstützer von Rap für Refugees und auf den meisten großen Veranstaltungen zu finden. Weitere Künstler sind Chima Ede, Disarstar, Sookee und Lia Sahin uvm.

Jeder Mensch ist ein Geflüchteter. Auch wir selber können Geflüchtete sein.

Ata Anat

Gründer Rap for Refugees

Ich habe mit Ata darüber gesprochen, wie er auf die Idee für Rap for Refugees kam, was seither alles passiert ist und was er für Pläne für die Zukunft hat.

Er hofft nun in naher Zukunft passende Sponsoren und Förderer zu finden, um auch weiterhin seine Arbeit fortsetzen zu können. Als gemeinnützige e. V. ist Rap for Refugees weiterhin auf eure Spenden und Stützen angewiesen. Infos dazu findest du hier.

Like my work?

You can support my work if you become a Patron. It’s simple: choose one of 4 tiers and receive shoutouts, free The Healer Hip Hop Merch, behind the scenes access and more!

More Blog Posts

#27: Kathy Iandoli – God save the Queens

#27: Kathy Iandoli – God save the Queens

In this episode I talked with Kathy Iandoli about her new book "Go save the Queens" - the long overdue 'her'story of women in Hip Hop written by the veteran Hip Hop author.  It's About time  Every history of hip-hop previously published, from Jeff Chang’s Can’t Stop...

read more
The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019

The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019

 Check out The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019! Apple and Spotify Congrats on Mahalia for her first release album! I've been following her for a while now and love her debut!Also big congrats to Lafyette from episode #19 on his first release! His song We love, then...

read more
The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019

The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019

  Check out The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019! Apple and Spotify Until soon, xxx, AnaYou can support my work if you become a Patron. It's simple: choose one of 4 tiers and receive shoutouts, free The Healer Hip Hop Merch, behind the scenes access and more!

read more

#21 Afrikan Boy goes Y.A.M.

#21: Afrikan Boy goes Y.A.M.

by Artist Name

The interview with Afrikan Boy was one of the funniest I ever had! We talked about his start as a rapper, why he called himself Afrikan Boy and why it’s spelled with a “K”. 

The whole point of my career is to bring African influence into what I do, knowing that I’m abroad. Afrikan Boy

I’m not just Afrikan Boy for me, I’m Afrikan Boy for all these other people who have stories to be told. Afrikan Boy

#20: The Miseducation of Ana Swartz

#20: The Miseducation of Ana Swartz

by The Healer Hip Hop | Podcast

Ok, so here it is: this is the music I’ve made about ten years ago. I’ve promised to publish my music to Anna-Liisa Donnatella on Episode 16. It took a lot of courage to actually follow through with it but now that I did, I’m very proud of myself! 

The Miseducation of Ana Swartz

I chose this title, because The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill had played a major role in my life and in my love for music. All I know about music and how it makes me feel, I got it from Lauryn (and Erykah, of course). This album was on heavy rotation for about 3 years and it had a major impact on me. Lauryn had poured her heart out in her debut, just like I poured mine into these songs.

The first song “Little Prayer” may not be my best song, but it means a lot to me. I wrote it when I had my whole world fall apart from kidney failure. I lost my health and with it myself, my job, my money and any hope. I didn’t understand what was happening to me at that time and that’s why I wrote this little prayer. I still sing it to this day whenever I need some courage and a reminder that sometimes I don’t need to understand what’s going on. Life will eventually let me know anyway.

Listening to it now let’s me know that my prayers have been answered. I know now that I had to go through these things. Not only to find healing for me and my kidneys, but also to find myself.

In that way, The Miseducation of Ana Swartz represents that long journey back to myself and I welcome you to be a part of it.

Listen with your heart

While listening, please remember that this music was basically meant for myself as therapy. I’m no producer. I did all the beats with my little Music Maker and a cheap mic in a little chamber of my home.

So listen with your heart first 🙂

Love, 

Ana

 

Like my work?

You can support my work if you become a Patron. It’s simple: choose one of 4 tiers and receive shoutouts, free The Healer Hip Hop Merch, behind the scenes access and more!

More Blog Posts

#27: Kathy Iandoli – God save the Queens

#27: Kathy Iandoli – God save the Queens

In this episode I talked with Kathy Iandoli about her new book "Go save the Queens" - the long overdue 'her'story of women in Hip Hop written by the veteran Hip Hop author.  It's About time  Every history of hip-hop previously published, from Jeff Chang’s Can’t Stop...

read more
The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019

The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019

 Check out The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019! Apple and Spotify Congrats on Mahalia for her first release album! I've been following her for a while now and love her debut!Also big congrats to Lafyette from episode #19 on his first release! His song We love, then...

read more
The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019

The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019

  Check out The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019! Apple and Spotify Until soon, xxx, AnaYou can support my work if you become a Patron. It's simple: choose one of 4 tiers and receive shoutouts, free The Healer Hip Hop Merch, behind the scenes access and more!

read more

#19: Small Literature

#19: Small Literature

by The Healer Hip Hop | Podcast

Lafayette Lewis goes by the producer name Small Literature. I first got in touch with him through IG and he made a The Healer Hip Hop remix for me which I was supposed to play in this epsiode. But I ended up choosing a song from his latest album instead.

That album – Kind of you – is dedicated to his sister who passed away last year around the same time I received my gift to second chance at life. That’s why I feel a special connection to him and his music about her. I dedicate this episode to his sister.

From Hip Hop to Rock and back

Small Literature is from St. Petersburg, Florida, so he grew up predominantly around Southern Hip Hop Rappers such as  Mystikal, Master P, T.I. etc.

Starting High School, he also came in touch with Rock Music, e.g. Fall Out Boy, Creed, but also classics like Led Zeppelin and the Pixies. From there he transitioned to discovering all types of music across all genres and eras.

The name Small Literature was originally meant for a band, but it ended up becoming his producer name. 

Your music should reflect your personality

Producing came natural to him, because he had always been passionate about listening to every detail of music. Some of his favorite producers are Madlib, J Dilla, The Alchemist and Oddisee.

He puts out a lot of music (just look at his IG) because he has found a formula that makes him able to produce a beat quickly. Also, he found that in the 60’s bands used to put out 5 to 6 albums a year. To Lafayette  it’s not just about creating the perfect album, but also documenting the journey of the creative process to that perfect album. 

Favorite Music

Lastly, Lafayette is my go to person for musical inspiration – new and old! On each of my playlists there is at least one song or artist that I got to know through him. His favorite artists at the moment are Black Milk, The Alchemist and Tokimonsta:

There is a right way to use music. It’s all about what’s in you. What you are willing to give on a positive end. People can feel that. In the South they have Soul Food. You can tell when it’s made with the heart and soul. The good in Hip Hop is always made with a heart and soul.

Small Literature

on how Hip Hop can be a Healer

In the future, he plans to have artists sing to his beats, so feel free to contact him through his Bandcamp or IG!

Like my work?

You can support my work if you become a Patron. It’s simple: choose one of 4 tiers and receive shoutouts, free The Healer Hip Hop Merch, behind the scenes access and more!

More Blog Posts

#27: Kathy Iandoli – God save the Queens

#27: Kathy Iandoli – God save the Queens

In this episode I talked with Kathy Iandoli about her new book "Go save the Queens" - the long overdue 'her'story of women in Hip Hop written by the veteran Hip Hop author.  It's About time  Every history of hip-hop previously published, from Jeff Chang’s Can’t Stop...

read more
The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019

The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019

 Check out The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Fall 2019! Apple and Spotify Congrats on Mahalia for her first release album! I've been following her for a while now and love her debut!Also big congrats to Lafyette from episode #19 on his first release! His song We love, then...

read more
The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019

The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019

  Check out The Healer Hip Hop Playlist Summer 2019! Apple and Spotify Until soon, xxx, AnaYou can support my work if you become a Patron. It's simple: choose one of 4 tiers and receive shoutouts, free The Healer Hip Hop Merch, behind the scenes access and more!

read more